NORTHEAST AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR EIGHTEENTH CENTURY STUDIES

Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Call for Papers

Buffalo, N.Y., October 21-23, 2010

Deadline for paper proposals:  May 15, 2010

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Instructions to those submitting papers:

Send a 250-word paper proposal and short cv directly to the panel organizer by May 15.

Please apply to only one panel.

The panel organizer will inform you of whether your paper has been accepted shortly after May 15.  If your paper is not accepted, the panel organizer will forward it to the program committee, which will try to place it onto another panel.

If none of the open panels are appropriate for your paper, you may send your abstract and cv directly to the program committee at seeman@buffalo.edu.

Untraveled Meanings in the Americanization of Eighteenth-Century Europeans

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Sierra Adare-Tasiwoopa ápi
University at Buffalo
ssadare@yahoo.com
 

Sir Thomas Browne devoted a lifetime to compiling the materials that he hoped would reveal the “untraveled parts of Truth.” Adventurers, colonial chroniclers, and planters added their own epistemologies in deference to the disclosure of untraveled truths. They and others sought to build a bridge between Old World notions and New World realities through their treatises, tracts, broadsides, memoirs, narratives, and histories. This panel will explore the reconciling of Eurowestern ideals with the emerging American culture of the eighteenth century as a means of illuminating the untraveled meanings of becoming American. As noted by Frederick Jackson Turner, the wilderness Americanizes the Europeans. The New World demanded new rationales, new worldviews.

Much discourse surrounds issues of American exceptionalism, America’s location within early globalization, and transatlantic interconnectedness. Pursuing the untraveled meanings that led to the Americanization of the European settlers during the eighteenth centuries has the potential to add another dimension to our understanding of what makes an American an American and how we might apply this awareness as we grapple with an evolving sense of American identity within a wider context.

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Objects of Inquiry and Exchange: Circulating Things in the Global Eighteenth Century

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Ileana Baird
University of Virginia
ifp4a@virginia.edu
 

Whereas the temporal expanse of the “long” eighteenth-century has been repeatedly emphasized, its spatial inclusiveness and thematic coincidences beyond British (or British colonial) boundaries is still insufficiently addressed. This panel invites papers that may fill in this informational gap: they will search into how the increased production and circulation of things during the century has encouraged processes of cultural, scientific, and commercial exchange that may justify its consideration from a more globalizing perspective. How does the narrative and material circulation of things bring the Western and Eastern worlds together? How do the emerging practices of collection, connoisseurship, and antiquarianism promote intercultural exchange? What do the “speaking objects” of the it-narratives tell about the various spaces they inhabit? How does the global circulation of commodities, exotic objects, and souvenirs bring scientific evidence to the existence of unfamiliar places? How does the traffic in china, fabrics, spices, and perfumes speak about the emerging interest in Orientalism manifested during the century? Last but not least, what is a “thing” in eighteenth century and how are its meanings reworked in various cultural contexts?

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Body Art: Ethics and Aesthetics in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Jacob Bodway
University at Buffalo
jacob.bodway@gmail.com
 

This panel welcomes papers that discuss various ways in which eighteenth-century British art and literature approached ethics as an issue that concerned representations of the body.  Some questions that can be considered: Was it immoral or unnatural to apply too much art to the body?  If so, then where did one draw the line between the morally beautiful body and the morally ugly body, not to mention those bodies that were ambiguous, abnormal, or monstrous?  And how did aesthetics come to define the ethical body in ways that implicated class and gender?  Papers may consider how the “beauty of virtue” was understood as an artistic or literary trope, ways in which the “body image” served as a locus for moral instruction, or how characters in sentimental fiction were depicted as the embodiment of virtue.

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Spreading the Word about Art in the Eighteenth Century

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Sharon Bodeo
Finger Lakes Community College
Boedo1@aol.com
 

It is certain that the interest in the visual arts spread more widely and deeply throughout the course of the eighteenth century, as witnessed by the growing popularity of public exhibitions and the great circulation, sometimes clandestine, of written commentaries about art.  But, there were other mechanisms for transmitting knowledge, such as the publication of theoretical, historical, and practical treatises, or lavish volumes of engraved reproductions.  The transmission of art knowledge through academies also increases more institutions are founded throughout Europe during the eighteenth century.  This panel seeks papers that explore the various means for gathering and disseminating information about art, both visual, textual, and pedagogically, and their influence upon eighteenth-century European or American cultures.

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Pirates of the Caribbean:  The Eighteenth-Century “Golden Age of Pyrating”

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Robert B. Craig
Independent Scholar
Craigrbcm@aol.com
 

Historians and scholars generally define the term, “Golden Age of Pirating in the Caribbean” as the period starting in the later 17th Century until approximately 1720.  Others believe it began early in the 16th century.  Regardless, the rise and fall of “pyrating” on the Spanish Main provided for a bountiful treasure of the pirate characters, their ferocity, adventures, and exploits for some of the most charismatic sailors the world has ever experienced.  The media – novels and television – have been largely responsible for bringing these adventures to us for entertainment.  Unfortunately, much of what has been presented in this manner is inaccurate or wrong.  Pirates were largely businessmen.  They were well organized, considerate, and idealistic individuals who approached their trade much as a businessman does today.  The pirate crews were generally democratic, electing their respective captains, and terminating his services when the majority so decided.  The crews had a form of “estate planning,” an approved list of articles on which, following their signature, they cooperated and functioned. Their “medical plans” covered the loss of eyes, limbs, and even included death benefits.

This panel seeks to offer an opportunity for historians and others to present details on the impact of pirates on the business and economy of the Caribbean region, the exploration of multi-national interests involved, and a glimpse of the days of “pyrating” in the eighteenth century.

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 The Glocal Eighteenth Century

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Evan Gottlieb
Oregon State University
Evan.Gottlieb@oregonstate.edu
 

From Addison’s Spectator #69 -- which famously delineates how a modern woman’s costume is composed of items from around the world -- to Wordsworth’s The Prelude -- which remembers the early days of the French Revolution as a time when “the world, which is the world of all of us” seemed open to radical revisioning -- British literature from the Restoration to Romanticism is saturated with references that simultaneously site the local through the global, and vice versa. With an obvious debt to Felicity Nussbaum’s 2003 collection, The Global Eighteenth Century -- but with an increased awareness of the phenomenon of “glocality” -- this panel will provide an opportunity for further reflection on the imbrications of local and global frames of reference in the literature and culture of the long eighteenth century.

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The Pedagogy of the Obsessed:  Writers as Schoolmasters and Governesses

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Ann A. Huse
John Jay College, CUNY
annhuse@yahoo.com
 

John Aubrey’s comment that Shakespeare “had been in his younger yeares a schoolmaster in the Countrey” has led scholars to scour the Midlands for the aristocratic family he might have served as an unlicensed teacher. In contrast, the pedagogical activities of certain writers from the long eighteenth century are generally well documented.  Yet the connection between their employment as educators and their production as artists bears further scrutiny. How do the pedagogical treatises and practices of these authors reflect the preoccupations found in their fictions–and reveal the interests of their employers?

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Clothing in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Ula Lukszo
Stony Brook University
ula_lukszo@yahoo.com
 

A confluence of cultural, economic and legal trends in the eighteenth-century rendered clothing, shopping and fashion of utmost importance. The fashion for masquerades bloomed, fabrics arrived in Europe from the various corners of the world, and the middle-class woman acquired all the clothes and fashions to make her indistinguishable from her upper-class models. Though masquerades were roundly denounced by many, and the ease of the lower-classes to ape their betters worried preachers and snobs alike, the novels of the eighteenth-century portray fashion and class cross-dressing in a variety of lights, both positive and negative. One only has to think of Defoe’s Roxana, who is able to “pass” as a lady one day, and a Quaker the next, to see the flexibility of fashion and clothes in the eighteenth-century novel. This panel will explore how writers incorporate and comment on fashions of the day; how they use the costumes of masquerade to reveal character; and how they played with the various kinds of cross-dressing available to their characters—gender, social and racial cross-dressing.

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Warfare and the Environment in the Long Eighteenth Century

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Craig Miller
University at Buffalo
craigdiesel@yahoo.com
 

This panel seeks original work that examines the ways in which warfare affected and was affected by the environment and geography. Of particular interest are papers that explore one or more of the following topics: resource extraction as a source of conflict, the role of geography on the prosecution of war and descriptions of the environment in war and post-war literature. Papers investigating other aspects of war in the long eighteenth century are welcome as well. Proposals do not have to be limited to studies of war between native peoples and European colonists; work on war between Indians and work on war between Europeans is also encouraged.

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“Rambling” Women in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Jonathan Nash
University at Albany
jr.nash01@albany.edu
 

During the eighteenth century, many adventure stories featuring women protagonists were published. These narratives often set on the fringes of Atlantic empires allowed members of eighteenth-century reading publics to participate vicariously in the intellectual construction of empire. Through the process of reading, Europeans learned about the cultures of colonized people and the environments of colonial holdings. The narratives employed the language of an emerging culture of sensibility, to on the one hand, imagine European expansion, and on the other, to criticize the violence of empire. In addition, the narratives often transgressed accepted gender norms within imagined, imperial spaces. This panel invites papers that use adventure narratives to reconsider the relationships between eighteenth-century metropoles and peripheries.

Papers included in this panel may analyze how these narratives influenced emerging definitions of gender, environment, history, the body, temporality, sensibility, empire, and race. Panelists might consider how these narratives invited alternative possibilities and contexts to narrate contacts between Amerindians, Africans, and Europeans, conquest, the establishment of European colonial footholds, and the role literary archives play in shaping scholarly reconstructions. All relevant methodologies are encouraged, including approaches focused through history, literary studies, trans/circumatlantic studies, eco-criticism, print and material culture, as well as postcolonial studies.

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Mediating Intercultural Exchange

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Daniel O’Quinn
University of Guelph
doquinn@uoguelph.ca
 

What does the practice of media archeology offer for analyses of intercultural exchange in the eighteenth century?  This panel seeks to explore how intercultural relations were framed and/or conditioned by a range of eighteenth-century media.  The panel is particularly interested in the representation of cultural exchange between Europeans and non-European peoples either in distant locales or in the heart of the metropole itself.  The panel welcomes submissions from scholars of new media in the eighteenth-century, of early museums, of visual machines, of performance and of the practices which made up the print public sphere.

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The American Enlightenment

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Mark G. Spencer
Brock University
mspencer@brocku.ca
 

This interdisciplinary panel welcomes paper proposals that shed light on the American Enlightenment. It has long been appreciated that Americans made their own contributions to the Enlightenment, most notably by putting Enlightenment ideas to work in defining the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the nature of the early American Republic. But recent scholarship—including the Encyclopedia of the American Enlightenment (which will contain original essays by more than 500 scholars and is scheduled to be published by Continuum in 2011)—suggests that the Enlightenment in America was more far reaching than even that story assumes. Indeed, the American Enlightenment might advantageously be thought of as constituting the central framework for understanding the development of American history between c1740 and c1820. Papers in this panel will demonstrate some of these possibilities.

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Representing Women’s Medico-Literary Texts in the Long Eighteenth Century

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Angela Monsam and Danielle Spratt
Fordham University
monsam@fordham.edu and dspratt@fordham.edu 
 

Over the past several decades, critics have explored how literature and medical texts represented and often objectified women during the long eighteenth century.  In addition to examining representations of women, their bodies, and “female” illnesses – both in medical and literary texts, this panel also considers how women responded or “wrote back” to such objectification. We are especially interested in papers that explore the various ways in which women directly adopt, negotiate, or manipulate discourses of medicine, whether about their own bodies or the bodies of others.  In so doing, the panel hopes to demonstrate how women writers were able to carve out their own empowered textual space in the increasingly male-dominated medical realm. Possible authors include (but are not limited to) Ann Conway, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Mary Wortley Montagu, Joanna Baille, Ann Hunter, Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, and Mary Robinson; potential textual sources include signed and anonymous midwifery and cookery books.

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Form and Resistance in the Four Nations

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Jeff Strabone
University of South Florida
jeff@strabone.com
 

This panel proposes to bring together multiple paradigms in recent literary study: New Formalism, a "four nations" (England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales) approach to British culture and history, and post-colonial studies. The question that will animate the panel is, How did British subjects use the properties of literary form to resist English domination in the eighteenth century? Within "these islands," the eighteenth century was an era of political Union, emerging empire, the standardization of the English language, the stigmatization of Gaelic and oral cultures, and, in the case of the Scottish Highlands, military occupation. How did men and women of this era revive, reinvent, appropriate, and hybridize formal features like genre, stanza, diction, figurative language, and annotation in order to contest their place in the United Kingdom with regard to questions of nation, gender, class, region, or cultural-hierarchical questions of high and low? Papers that explore particular cases of form as resistance or that plumb the theoretical and methodological issues raised by applying these paradigms to the eighteenth-century British Isles will both be welcome.

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Teaching the History of the Eighteenth-Century Book

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

Lisa M. Wilson
SUNY College at Potsdam
wilsonlm@potsdam.edu
 

How and why do we incorporate the history of books into our courses?  Papers on new approaches to teaching the history of the eighteenth-century book in courses for students from first year undergraduates to Ph.D. candidates.  Any aspect of:  books as material objects and commodities; the book trade; bibliographical methods; typeface and illustration; bindings and paper; collections, reprints and series, pirated editions; networks of publishers, printers, booksellers, circulating libraries, authors, reviewers, and readers; use of/access to print and electronic archives.  Papers might focus on course, unit, or lesson/assignment design but should also go beyond simply describing course elements to reflect on pedagogical methods, reasoning, theoretical assumptions.

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Reading/Reciting/Performing Eighteenth-Century Verse: A Roundtable on the Pedagogical and Interpretive Value of Performing -- Reading Aloud or Reciting from Memory -- Eighteenth-Century English Poetry

Send paper proposal and short cv by May 15 to:

John Richetti
University of Pennsylvania
jrichett@english.upenn.edu

This roundtable will invite participants (five or six) to read or (preferably) recite from memory a short poem or a part of a longer eighteenth-century English poem and to present in extemporaneous fashion their thoughts on how such performance can enrich our understanding of how such verse works and whether such oral delivery can help students to comprehend and to appreciate such verse. Audience members will be invited to critique and respond to these readings and recitations (or even to offer their own).

 

The NEASECS 2010 Buffalo program committee consists of Richard Bailey, History, Canisius College; Ruth Mack, English, University at Buffalo; and Erik Seeman, History, University at Buffalo (chair). 

Illustration: Sir Joshua Reynolds.  Cupid as Link Boy.  Albright-Knox Art Gallery