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Tagged as: Historical

Panel Discussion: The Candidates and Issues on November’s Ballot

Open discussion of the candidates and issues on November’s ballot. Moderator: Matt Hoenes. Speakers: Anthony Neal, associate professor, Political Science; Paul Tokasz, former New York State Assemblyman and Majority Leader; Peter Yacobucci, assistant professor, Political Science. Read more.  [more…]


History, Psychology, and Social Movements Lecture Series: Belinda Davis

As part of the History, Psychology, and Social Movements Lecture Series, Belinda Davis, associate professor of history at Rutgers University, presents "The Inner Life of Politics: The 'New Left' in West Germany, 1962-1983."  [more…]


Haiti Teach-In: The Culture of Haiti

Programs to help students, faculty, and staff be more aware of the complex issues related to Haiti as it seeks to rebuild after its tragic earthquake.  [more…]

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Community

Haiti Teach-In: Understanding Haiti

Program to help students, faculty, and staff be more aware of the complex issues related to Haiti as it seeks to rebuild after its tragic earthquake.  [more…]

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Speeches

Africa Week Lecture: Carl Wilkens on "Rwanda 1994 and Beyond"

The African and African American Studies Interdisciplinary Unit (AAAS) presented a lecture by Carl Wilkens, the only American who stayed in Rwanda after the 1994 genocide started. Wilkens's decision resulted in preventing the massacre of hundreds of orphans between April and July 1994. His story has inspired many in the United States, Rwanda, and around the world.  [more…]


Constitution Day and Citizenship Day Discussion: Gene Nichol

In this podcast, Gene Nichol, professor of Law and former dean of the University of North Carolina School of Law and president emeritus of the College of William & Mary, speaks with students and faculty on the subject of equal justice in the Constitution.  [more…]


Constitution Day: Electoral College Debate

Should the Electoral College be abolished and replaced by a popular vote or does it continue to serve constructive purposes? In commemoration of Constitution Day, Buffalo State students and faculty from the Political Science and History and Social Studies Education departments debate the merits of the American presidential electoral system in this roundtable format.


Panel Discussion: Constitution Day Debate

On September 18, 2007, Buffalo State celebrated Constitution Day with a spirited conversation. In this podcast, Political Science Department students and faculty discuss the issue of slavery in the U.S. Constitution. Sponsored by the Political Science Department, Student Political Society, and University College.

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Community

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Imhotep

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Leonardo da Vinci (Interview)

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Pablo Picasso (Interview)

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Charles Darwin

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Grace Murray Hopper

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Charlie Parker

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Great Minds Student Podcasts: Alan Turing

In the spring 2007 semester, students in Ramona Santa Maria's Computer Information Systems 101 classes were given an assignment to create, edit, and post a podcast. The charge was to profile some of the individuals included in Buffalo State's 2006-2008 academic theme, Great Minds That Shaped Our Intellectual World, and other noted scholars. The end results provide an imaginative, informative, and fun look at some of history's most influential intellectuals.  [more…]

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Great Minds |
Technology

Lecture: Buffalo Women Making History II

Guest speakers: Tamara Brown of the American Association of University Women (AAUW), Buffalo Chapter; Marie Cannon of the Buffalo & Erie County Girl Scouts Council; Marian Deutschman of the League of Women Voters; and Donna Fernandez of the Buffalo Zoological Gardens. This Women's History Month Event was sponsored by the Women's Studies Interdisciplinary Unit and several organizations and departments.

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Community

Lecture: Buffalo Women Making History

Buffalo Women Making History Part I featured Anne Harrington of Loaves and Fishes Dining Room; Rosa Gibson of Community Action Information Center; Terri Mazza of Vive la Casa Refugee Center; and Constance Eve of Women for Human Rights. This Women's History Month Event was sponsored by the Women's Studies Interdisciplinary Unit and several organizations and departments.

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Community

Forum: The Great Debate

A forum where professors representing different areas of the liberal arts explained the contributions and value of their disciplines. The panel consisted of representatives from the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences in a discussion intended to inspire an appreciation and understanding of the value of all the liberal arts.

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Community |
Arts |
Academic

Panel Discussion: The U.S. Constitution

On September 14, Buffalo State celebrated Constitution Day with a panel discussion about the background and meaning of the U.S. Constitution. Buffalo State panelists Gary Marotta and David Carson of the History and Social Studies Education Department and guest panelist Joe Golombek of Buffalo's Common Council discussed the document's origins, mechanics, and continued significance for modern politics.


Panel Discussion: Understanding the Relationship Between China and Tibet

In this podcast, a Buffalo State faculty panel discusses the important historical, geographical, political, cultural, and contemporary issues in the sensitive relationship between China and Tibet. Speakers included Michael Lazich, associate professor, History Department; Zhang Jie, professor and director, Center for China Studies, Tao Tang, associate professor, Geography and Planning Department, and Lin Xia Jiang, chair and professor, Fine Arts Department. Laurie Buonanno, chair and professor, Political Science, moderated the discussion.

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Academic

Lecture: From the Niagara Movement to the NAACP

Session X of What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York. Patricia Sullivan has written extensively on the civil rights movement, including Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era. Currently, Sullivan is writing a history of the NAACP. Respondent Bruce J. Dierenfield is author of The Civil Rights Movement (2004). Kim Biggs discusses activities planned for the Harper's Ferry Centennial for 2006.


Lecture: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Talented Tenth

Session IX: What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York.  [more…]


Lecture: Session VIII: Black Women and the Early Freedom Struggle

Lillian Williams, Chair and Associate Professor, African American Studies, SUNY Buffalo, and author of: Strangers in the Land of Paradise: The Creation of an African American Community in Buffalo, New York, 1900-1940, (1999), examines the ties between Mary B. Talbert's work with the Niagara Movement and the Black Women's Club Movement. Respondent Shelia Martin, Assistant Professor, English, Erie Community College, has conducted extensive research on Ida B. Wells Barnett, Mary Church Terrell, and the early years of the Women's Club Movement during the late 19th and early 20th century.


Celebrate Marian Anderson!

A reception at E. H. Butler Library in honor of the great contralto Marian Anderson, featured photographs of the singer, live vocal performances of songs made famous by Ms. Anderson, and memorabilia from her remarkable life.

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Arts

Lecture: The Triumph and Tragedy of Booker T. Washington

Session VII of What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York. Filmmaker Avon Kirkland will screen excerpts of his work-in-progress, a film on the legendary Booker T. Washington. Kirkland's feature length documentary, Ralph Ellison: An American Journey, was an official selection for the 2002 Sundance Film Festival, and was broadcast on PBS by the Emmy Award-winning series, American Masters. Musa Abdul Hakim will serve as respondent.


Lecture: J. Edward Nash and the Michigan Avenue Baptist Church

In Session VI of What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York, Felix Armfield, associate professor, History and Social Studies Education, Buffalo State, and Executive Director of the Nash House and Museum, will discuss Reverend J.E. Nash's prominence during the first half of the twentieth century. Jesse Nash, professor emeritus, Canisius College, will share his experiences growing up in the Nash home.


Lecture: From Pan Am Protest to the Niagara Movement

Session V: What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York explores connections between the Pan Am Exhibition and the Niagara Movement. Presenter Barbara Nevergold, co-editor, Uncrowned Queens: African American Community Builders of Western New York is joined by respondents Sharon Holley, Afro-American Folklorist and Librarian, Buffalo and Erie County Library, and fellow Uncrowned Queens co-editor Peggy Brooks-Bertram.


Lecture: Afro-Canadians: Beyond the Canadian Border

Session IV of What Price Freedom? features a distinguished panel: Wilma Morrison, Nathaniel Dett Museum- British Methodist Episcopal Church, Donna M. Ford- Central Ontario Black History Network, and Brian Prince- Southwest Ontario Black History Network. They discuss life experiences among Afro-Canadians highlighting ties to the free Black community in Western New York.


Lecture: Free Blacks in the Antebellum North

In Session III of What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York, Larry E. Hudson, author of Slave Work and Family Life in Antebellum South Carolina, discussed the civil status of African Americans in the North. Jason Young, assistant professor, History, University at Buffalo, served as respondent.


Lecture: From Slavery to Freedom: The Emergence of the Neo Slave Narrative

Session II: What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York. Waldo Martin, author of The Mind of Frederick Douglass, traces the evolution of the slave narrative to the neo slave narrative through the works of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Booker T. Washington. Felix Armfield, author of Black Life in Central Illinois, serves as respondent.


Lecture: Tales of the Underground Railroad

Session I of What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York featured a screening of Tales of the Underground Railroad: On the Erie Canal, a film produced by Buffalo State alumnae James P. Gribbins and Bernadette Medige. Presenter Kevin Cottrell, a local authority on the Underground Railroad, and respondent Kim Pearson, The College of New Jersey, will discussed the film and answered questions.


Press Conference: What Price Freedom?

Wanda Davis, associate professor of educational foundations, Felix Armfield, associate professor of history and social studies education, Shelia Martin, assistant professor of English at Erie Community College, and others discuss the distinguished lecture series What Price Freedom? The Centennial Celebration of the Niagara Movement in Buffalo, New York. Learn more about the lecture series at www.buffalostate.edu/niagaramovement.


Academic Theme CD: Moon Landing

No one person was responsible for the space program, but Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong's words, from the surface of the moon, spoke of the culmination of many scientific and technological achievements.  [more…]

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Academic

Academic Theme CD: John F. Kennedy's Radio and Television Report to the American People on Civil Rights

On June 11, 1963, President John Kennedy gave a report to the American people explaining the order he had given to the Alabama National Guard to supervise the integration of the University of Alabama and admit two "qualified Alabama residents who happened to have been born Negro." Kennedy addressed the issue of inequality in America, describing the nation's moral choice on the question of whether all Americans are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities. Later that month, Kennedy sent a special message to Congress, calling for extensive civil rights legislation, but Congress did not act until 1964, after the president's death.  [more…]

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Academic

Academic Theme CD: Mario Cuomo's Democratic National Convention Keynote Address

Mario Cuomo, then governor of New York, delivered his most memorable speech on July 16, 1984, at the Democratic National Convention in San Francisco, California. In this portion of that keynote address, Cuomo contrasts then- President Ronald Reagan's image of the United States as a "shining city on a hill" with another America experienced by many of her citizens. He suggests that the real story was "a tale of two cities," and stressed the gap between the haves and have-nots in 1980s America.  [more…]

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Academic

Academic Theme CD: Franklin Delano Roosevelt's War Message

On December 7, 1941, Japanese forces attacked the U.S. Pacific Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, killing 2,400 Americans. The next day, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave this famous speech informing Americans that, to his mind, a state of war had existed since the moment of the attack. Although the president, and America, had taken an isolationist stance prior to the attack, American attitudes were dramatically changed by the attack and Roosevelt's speech. By contrasting an early draft of the message with the text of the speech as Roosevelt delivered it, we can gain insight to the ways seemingly minor word changes can dramatically alter the rhetorical power of a message.  [more…]

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Academic